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where do most of you get your PC games?

I am assuming Stream is the primary for everyone. Maybe GOG or best old games?

any other suggestions?

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Comments

  • SintacsSintacs Centurion

    Steam, Origin, GoG, G2A, IndieGala, Humble Bundle. Though everything but GoG and Origin redeems through Steam anyway.

  • Law212Law212 Centurion

    All those listed. Depends on where the sale is. I also check G2A a lot because I Have gotten some great deals from that site.
    When it comes to games like Gears 4 though I'm limited to the MS store.

  • Typically Steam, and Battle.net for Blizzard's games.

  • Steam.
    I should log into GoG sometime. It's been a while.
  • humble bundle on the odd occasion. Mostly Steam though

  • Steam, gog, humble bundle and greenman gaming.

  • If there isn't a Steam sale then I get it from either Green Man Gaming or CD Keys.

  • ok question, I have never overclocked anything before, and I dont have a clue what my ambient temperature of my CPU is at various load levels or even how to check it. Do we have an existing thread or can anyone off some resources with regard to doing some experimenting with overclocking?

  • Law212Law212 Centurion

    Some motherboards have good overclocking software included. Ther are also third party programs where you can overclock and keep track of temperatures. I don't overclock so I don't know what a good one might be.

  • RajioRajio Centurion

    not a huge steam fan so if i can avoid it, i do

  • SintacsSintacs Centurion

    @Rajio said:
    not a huge steam fan so if i can avoid it, i do

    I used to be that way too, and I still don't like it, but I found I was starting to miss out on too many games, so I just said "fuck it" and started using it more.

  • Law212Law212 Centurion

    I see no downside to steam.

  • RajioRajio Centurion

    I don't like having to keep the client running in the background on my PC and I don't find the sales to be any better than other retailers at large either - they just get memed up more. Haven't missed out on a game yet. If a game is only available on steam for PC i'll still get the game, i'll just get it elsewhere if there is an option. I don't see any upside to having Steam.

  • I guess if you are concerned about your PC's resource management then keeping a client open might be a bit of a pain. However the small amount of research I have done has basically said that not only did Steam save PC gaming, it is one of the few reasons it still exists. I was opposed to some of the ideas around steam 13 years ago as well, but my views have softened considerably over the years.

    I have always PC gamed on my various laptops ( MMO's mostly) but I am pleasantly surprised now that I look deeper into the platform I am liking more and more of what I see! Also it allows us achievement whores who are sorrily missing any true sense of achievements in our mundane lives to feel "special", without having to kneel at the feet of the console gods! :)

  • SintacsSintacs Centurion

    @Rajio said:
    I don't find the sales to be any better than other retailers at large either - they just get memed up more.

    I have to agree with this. They did have some pretty amazing sales years back, but now they're really nothing. I bought so many games during one of the first few big sales I was around for because everything was so cheap, but now I'll buy maybe 2-3 things at most during a sale because the prices just aren't low enough to tempt me anymore.

  • RajioRajio Centurion
    edited October 2016

    @EchoGolfSierra said:
    not only did Steam save PC gaming, it is one of the few reasons it still exists.

    I dunno about that. PC gaming was thriving before, when, and since steam came about. People have a tendency to use a lot of hyperbole and rewrite history around steam and valve in general. Just to be clear I'm a big PC gamer **and **console gamer. always have been. so its not some pc-vs-console beef. i'm just very ambivalent towards steam. i don't see any real benefit from it.

    Look how people freak out over steam sales. other vendors and platforms have sales too which are similarly good. People pretend only steam offers such deep discounts but if you actually check, that isn't true. similar discounts are available on the same titles elsewhere. sometimes even cheaper. Steam deals can be fine, but they're not unique.

    Juxtapose
  • Steam didn't save anything, it only eased access for less experienced PC gamers to less popular games. It also brought a central hub for the gaming communities of all genre.

    Juxtapose
  • The central hub bit I know was a big thing for lots of people.

    Steam was hot air when it launched, but it's improved significantly. I don't think it's perfect, and as a glorified DRM tool I wouldn't cry if it vanished, so I guess that means I'm also neutral on it.

    I certainly don't think it saved anything, and when I look at it's sales I'm usually not sure what all the fuss is about outside of people spending lots of money on a bunch of games they'll never play just because they're "cheap."

    @Rajio When you play Overwatch, isn't the Battle.net Desktop App running in the background?

  • RajioRajio Centurion
    edited November 2016

    Yes but battle.net only loads as a launcher and is closed just as easily. it doesn't try to be a permanent running process by any means. it also doesn't advertise to me outside of the launcher (ie no popups when i close games, etc)

  • well I really hate to break it to ya....but all you asshats are full of shit! Most of you werent even born when PC gaming was really big! :)

    lol sorry was just tryin g to be funny...most of you have been around a while!

    But seriously though I watched the collapse of PC gaming back in the 90's because of piracy and cheat engines. The big buzz about Stream was it significantly reduced the PC software piracy problem and fought multiplayer cheating. Game makers were abandoning PC software releases and going to consoles because every anti-piracy technique they tried failed horribly.

    I remember reading articles and attending GDC type events where they would have panel after panel of discussions about the need for changes in PC gaming. Seemingly the internet had made cheating and piracy easier to do and harder to enforce.

    So you might be right....it might not have saved PC gaming,.... it resurrected it from the grave.

    I cant remember when blizzard started the battlenet (always connected) stuff was that with orcs and humans and diablo 1? but that was the same type of thing,

    Law212
  • @EchoGolfSierra said:
    well I really hate to break it to ya....but all you asshats are full of shit! Most of you werent even born when PC gaming was really big! :)

    lol sorry was just tryin g to be funny...most of you have been around a while!

    But seriously though I watched the collapse of PC gaming back in the 90's because of piracy and cheat engines. The big buzz about Stream was it significantly reduced the PC software piracy problem and fought multiplayer cheating. Game makers were abandoning PC software releases and going to consoles because every anti-piracy technique they tried failed horribly.

    I remember reading articles and attending GDC type events where they would have panel after panel of discussions about the need for changes in PC gaming. Seemingly the internet had made cheating and piracy easier to do and harder to enforce.

    So you might be right....it might not have saved PC gaming,.... it resurrected it from the grave.

    I cant remember when blizzard started the battlenet (always connected) stuff was that with orcs and humans and diablo 1? but that was the same type of thing,

    PC gaming was thriving in the 90's, it's the 2000's where it began to decline.

    Piracy was indeed an issue, and roughly in the mid-early 2000's developers and publishers started supporting more consoles for that and several other reasons:

    • The hardware around the PS2 and Xbox era were finally getting more on a level with PC hardware and design.
    • Unified hardware made developing easier.
    • With services like Xbox LIVE, piracy was easier to stop (though not impossible).
    • Console products could be sold for higher cost, so more profit.

    Those are just some off the top of my head.

    When Steam launched in 2004, it was garbage. It shipped with Half-Life 2, had loads of issues, required an Online connection to verify an Offline game when that was not a standard on PC or console at all, and actually violated the retail version of Half-Life 2's license agreement, which I recall caused a lawsuit in Germany.

    Steam got much better years later, but was trash at launch.

    It didn't save or resurrect PC gaming though, as people began more gravitating back to it roughly around 2010 as the current console hardware was getting older and PC game performance was so noticeably stronger. A service like Steam, a unified platform that many were now used to, simply made it more accessible for those returning, and for those who only played on console before.

    PC gaming and console gaming has gone in cycles, just as it does now. In the '80's, console gaming got big again. In the '90's PC gaming go larger, then dropped in the 2000's outside of MMO's, but started surging again in the late 2000's early 2010's. Now, I'd say PC gaming is stronger and more popular than console gaming, though each has it's pros and cons. Be interesting to see if it shifts back to consoles on top in the next few years.

    Battle.net launched in '96 with Diablo and almost single handedly eliminated pay to play sites of it's day. Free Online gaming was the thing until MMO's and Xbox LIVE, and then the shift happened and premium Online is now an established standard that thankfully hasn't completely bleed onto PC yet.

    Personally, I feel the late 90's to early 2000's is the "golden age" of gaming, never to come again. That was when developers were well in control of their products, innovated and created for the sake of doing so, and rewarded customers for loyalty. Nickle and diming was much rarer, triple A games were typically released complete and finished, etc.

  • For me, the golden age of gaming ended in 95 with the launch of windows 95 as a full blown OS. Ya some MMO's had a good run but basically, MMO's were and are the equivalent to farmville or candicrush.

    PC gaming from 88-95 drove technological advances from the XT straight through the 286, 386, 386sx, 486, 486dx, 486wmathco, to pentiium.

    When dos died, a little piece of every gamers soul died. I was building and selling computers and software back then ( during my days off in the military) in 1996 the bottom fell out of exerything. PC Gaming for the most part, dried up and blew away. Gaming stores ( outside the GTA) shut their doors, and gaming magazines folded.

    I went to MMO's and Blizzard like most PC gamers did but Nintendo and the original PlayStation was already taking over and were the only platforms to release new stuff monthly.

    When steam launched in 2003 (not 2004) other than MMO's and blizzard there was virtually NO PC gaming. For hardcore gamers maybe steam was viewed negatively. But for the casual PC gamers, steam was a savior.

    I understand Raj, and Jux's view points and perspectives perfectly. Their experiences were personally different. But for all my old clients ( who ultimately became long time friends) steam was a very very positive thing.

    They didnt have to fight with games to make them run anymore. Within a short period of time there were plenty of games that were easily accessible. And the company stood behind everything it launched.

    I guess it all depends on your perspectives. I have always owned consoles and PC's and the different memories and view points are very interesting to hear.

  • @EchoGolfSierra Yeah, different experiences with the same general thing are the spice of good conversation. My dad would always bring home company systems, 386's and 486's respectively. The first system we ever bought and owned though as a Pentium in mid-'95.

    I am younger than you, but I was gaming in the 80's and hardcore in the '90's and what was awesome for me was watching the industry grow, and industry that was very fledgling and grew with me.

    I remember the '90's as being very vibrant on PC gaming, not consoles. In the mid to late '90's I was in high school, and consoles were played by "kids" and what would now be called "filthy casuals."

    PC gaming had a significant variety in the mid to late '90's, such amazing titles and in '96 and after I'm not sure how it all dried out, as you call it.

    In 1996 we had Diablo and Battle.net launch, and also a little game called Quake. Duke Nukem 3D also launched that year and caused quite a stir with parents.

    Those were huge titles and major advances in games as a whole. I wasn't into RPG's at the time, but I want to say some major strides were done there as well (perhaps a Fallout game or Planescape or something similar).

    Moving on in the '90's, there were again so many spectacular titles. Starcraft launched furthering their competition with Command & Conquer and Total Annihilation got big as well. A little game called Half-Life launched and redefined gaming and FPS games as we knew them. System Shock 2 game along granting ripples in games that affect titles to this day. Quake II came out as well and was very well received.

    So yeah, those were some very, very strong times for PC gaming. I didn't even touch on the Star Wars titles that were huge at the time.

    I didn't see game shops closing in those days, but rather opening more and thriving; both chains and independents.

    Perhaps this was a location/regional thing?

  • The mid 80's also saw the rise of Sierra, Lucasarts and other role playing and adventure games

    Juxtapose
  • RajioRajio Centurion

    Thats an interesting discussion - when the golden age may have been.

    I can see a case for the late 80s to early 90s, just as i can see the case for the late 90s to early 2000s.

    Both eras were dealing with similar issues. they were both highly innovative times. the late 80s early 90s saw the (for lack of a better word) 'perfection' of the whole 2d gaming space. we got 16 bit and even 32 bit consoles, and pc-type gaming (including amiga etc) was booming. it was also they heyday for the last real wave of arcade games so since arcades died those games are now the 'classics'.

    on the other side, the late 90s and early 2000s saw the advancement of a lot of new and advanced tech. we moved to 3d graphics, we got more immersive audio, online possibilities expanded significantly beyond dialup doom II, and LAN parties etc with internet stuff really transformed multiplayer gaming.

    One time span is the end of an era when you saw the final form of a lot of things so those games are looked fondly upon now as the last and most advanced examples of certain things.

    The other time span is the start of something where you saw a lot of things that were new and the first examples of things that became much larger, so those games are looked fondly upon now as the first and most innovative examples of certain things.

    In a way you're both right, it just depends what you value more; innovating with new ideas, or the ultimate expression of an idea.

    That being said, I think you're both forgetting the late 70s early 80s. arcade boomed and video games really entered the mainstream in a big way. pac man fever hit the world. games were a crazy big phenomenon. you got movies and stuff about gaming (not movies based on a game, but about gaming and arcade culture). That was the start of video game culture.

  • Lucas arts was more of the 90's I think...sierra was big in the 90's too but their origins go back further

    in 1990 I started a retail PC building company and we also sold games and other software about 85-90% what the stores were selling it for. We could do that because we werent a brick and mortar store. We would come into your home...talk you through placing your order. We would then build it and test and install your software in by buddy's basement and deliver it to you and then spend the evening teaching you how to use it. Then we would take your calls and answer your questions as they came up.

    These customers all become our buddy's and we would share games and talk games and help each other solve problems. That was in Northbay. I earned enough so that my hardware upgrades done regularly were all pretty much free. I left northbay early in 95 for a year in the middle east. When I left my buddy was just launching a brick and mortar store because business was booming for us. I bowed out of the business opportunity because I was going to be gone for a year and would probably get posted out permanently once I got back. In the year I was gone 2 major PC game stores failed and when I got back my buddy was on his last legs. Literally having a going out of business sale the day I walked back in. The industry changed across Canada maybe not in the bigger centers like the GTA or vancouver/montreal, but in the average sized cities, pc game stores were disappearing.

    I played diablo for the first time around christmas 96. I was in london visiting family and my future brother in law introduced me to it. When I got back to Belleville area I had a hell of a time finding a store that sold PC games to buy a copy.

    But ya I find it funny how time, age and perspective changes how you perceived events :)

    From 90-95 I worked 4 on 4 off shift work 1 mile underground at Norad. On my days off I played games, sold systems and chased skirts. For me that will always be one of my favorite memories from my military service.

  • Even though we, as core gamers, usually buy games day 1, there is still a large percentage of people who buy games as holiday presents. And since Fall is the season where consumers spend most of all seasons, it is absolutely normal that developpers will want to release their new products during that time and profit from that increase of consumerism.

    As for the Golden age there are 2 ways of seeing it. The first would be during the late 90s-early 90s where consoles and games evolved enough to replace arcade games (especially graphically) which brought the 3rd major industry crash.

    The second way to see a Golden era is by looking at revenue increase in the industry which would mean that the PS3/Xbox360 gen would be the Gold age of gaming since it was the most profitable generation (so far) as developpers were breaking record sales year after year.

    Btw guys, in case you didn't know, we're a few months away from celebrating the 70th anniversary of video games 'cause Pong wasn't the first video game created (it was the first commercially sold though, and it's not Pong but Magnavox Odissey in 1971). The first game was created in 1947 and presented at a museum exhibit to show the possibility of interactivity between humans and tv screen, and it was called Tennis for two (you guys know this game as Pong). So, you jerks better start baking cake, you lousy pie lovers...lol

    RajioEchoGolfSierraJuxtapose
  • I absolutely love your final three paragraphs. Your first paragraph is based on old out of date information for the global market and face it gaming is a global industry now. Globally Christmas purchases arent as significant as they are here

  • How dare you call me old?.. oh Wait!! I guess i am old lol

    EchoGolfSierra
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